Articles

Allocation of fisheries resources

The point of departure for an individual vessel quota is a TAC (Total Allowable Catch) or total quota that Norway negotiates with other countries on an individual stock. 

Last changed: 07. May 2013

No borders under water

"There are no borders under water," a famous submarine captain stated a few years ago. And that's quite true when it comes to fisheries management in our waters. Norway shares almost all fish with other countries, and they swim in and out of the various countries' zones. 

Last changed: 07. May 2013

Norwegian fisheries management – does it work?

It is a recognized fact that the world's fish resources are not being managed in a sustainable manner.

Last changed: 07. May 2013

The coast is yours

Public rights is a well established principle of access to and use of nature in Norway. This also applies to the sea.

Last changed: 07. May 2013

Illegal fishing - can it be stopped?

Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, known as IUU fishing is a significant global problem. Tens of thousands of fishing vessels are engaged in illegal fishing or fishing on stocks that are not regulated or reported. IUU fishing is the greatest threat to fish stocks in the world today.

Last changed: 07. May 2013

The great seafood nation

Fishing has been an important industry for Norway since time immemorial. Exceptionally good natural conditions, good management and skilled industry practitioners makes Norway Europe's largest fisheries and aquaculture nation. With the right measures, we may harvest the sea and coast into eternity.

Last changed: 07. May 2013

The competition for the sea

Norway has the world's second-longest coastline, and manages an ocean area that is more than six times larger than mainland Norway. Nevertheless, different desires and needs for use of the sea may give rise to conflicts.

Last changed: 07. May 2013

Much has been done, new action being considered

Over the past 20–30 years, Norway has done a great deal to reduce discharges of nutrients from agriculture, municipal waste water treatment and industry. Similar steps have been taken in much of the rest of Europe, and these also benefit Norway.

Last changed: 02. April 2013

Important sources: fish farming, agriculture and waste water

Norwegian coastal waters can be divided into four main areas: the Skagerrak, the North Sea, the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea, with different levels of nutrient inputs.

Last changed: 02. April 2013

Eutrophication still a serious concern

Eutrophication in coastal waters and fjords in Norway is caused by discharges of nutrients from fish farming, runoff from agricultural areas, and inputs from industry and municipal waste water treatment. 

Last changed: 02. April 2013